Journal of Family & Community Medicine
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contact us Login 
 

Users Online: 368 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size

 

 Table of Contents 
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 57  

Metabolic syndrome and associated risk factors


Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, New Delhi, India

Date of Web Publication19-Jan-2015

Correspondence Address:
Ajeet Singh Bhadoria
Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, D 1, Vasant Kunj, Room No. 1043, New Delhi - 110 070
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8229.149593

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Bhadoria AS. Metabolic syndrome and associated risk factors. J Fam Community Med 2015;22:57

How to cite this URL:
Bhadoria AS. Metabolic syndrome and associated risk factors. J Fam Community Med [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Jun 19];22:57. Available from: http://www.jfcmonline.com/text.asp?2015/22/1/57/149593

Sir,

I have read a recent publication entitled "an epidemiological study of metabolic syndrome (MS) in a rural area of Ambala District, Haryana", and would like to comment on certain issues. [1] The prevalence of MS as found in the study was 9.2%. MS is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors. Although there are various definitions of MS, its common pathophysiology is insulin resistance, and a prominent clinical feature of the syndrome is abdominal or central obesity. [2]

In a study conducted by Pathania et al., the definition used was the clinical definition given by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). [3] It includes central obesity (waist circumference 90 cm in men and 80 cm in women) plus any two of the following four factors (i.e. raised triglycerides level: ≥150 mg/dl or a specific treatment for this lipid abnormality, reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: <40 mg/dl in males and < 50 mg/dl or a specific treatment for this lipid abnormality, raised blood pressure [BP]: Systolic BP ≥ 130 or diastolic BP ≥ 85 mm Hg or treatment for previously diagnosed hypertension, raised fasting plasma glucose ≥ 100 mg/dl [5.6 mmol/L] or previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes).

The authors indicated a significantly higher prevalence of MS with higher education. This is a valid finding as it indicates more premorbid status in individuals of higher social status. However, documenting an association of MS with hypertension, waist circumference and fasting glucose level is unprofitable, as the definition used for MS is inclusive of these parameters. The information regarding the association of MS with risk factors such as sociodemographic parameters, dietary habits, physical activity, personal habits, and other parameters of obesity could have been of immense help in improving the knowledge of readers.

The authors indicated that the WHO STEPS approach was used to collect the data. STEPS methodology mentions a specific technique for calculating sample size by taking into consideration 10-year-age groups, gender, design effect, etc. [4] Therefore, the sample size calculated and surveyed in the study would not have been adequate to reach a valid scientific conclusion. I suggest that this should be mentioned as a limitation of the study and readers cautioned to interpret these findings with this in mind.

 
   References Top

1.
Pathania D, Bunger R, Bunger E, Mishra P, Arora A. An epidemiological study of metabolic syndrome in a rural area of Ambala district, Haryana. J Family Community Med 2014;21:130-3.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Conthe P, Lobos JM. Definition and current situation of cardiometabolic risk. Rev Clin Esp 2008;208:63-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
International Diabetes Federation. The IDF Consensus Worldwide Definition of the Metabolic Syndrome. Available from: http://www.idf.org/webdata/docs/MetS_def_update2006.pdf. [Last accessed on 2014 Jul 19].  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
World Health Organization. STEP Wise Approach to Surveillance (STEPS). Available from: http://www.who.int/chp/steps/manual/en/index.html. [Last accessed on 2014 Jul 19].  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
    References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed977    
    Printed14    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded219    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Advertise | Sitemap | What's New | Feedback | Disclaimer
Journal of Family and Community Medicine | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Online since 05th September, 2010